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Ukrainians May Attempt to Cross Reservoir After They Blew Up Kakhovka Dam

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Ukrainians May Attempt to Cross Reservoir After They Blew Up Kakhovka Dam


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kakhovka reservoir, kakhovka dam, dam collapse, energodar, ukrainians may attempt to cross kakhovka reservoir, attack on zaporozhye nuclear power plant

kakhovka reservoir, kakhovka dam, dam collapse, energodar, ukrainians may attempt to cross kakhovka reservoir, attack on zaporozhye nuclear power plant

Ukraine blew up bridges and dams, and had plans to blow up more if it became necessary for the defense of Kiev to stop Russian forces besieging the capital. Now they have done the same, so that they can cross what used to be the Kakhovka reservoir on foot, Mark Sleboda, an international relations and security analyst, told Sputnik.

On June 6, the Kakhovka Hydroelectric Power Plant (HPP) was attacked by the Kiev regime and suffered extensive damage to its dam. This resulted in the destruction of the upper part of the dam and the subsequent uncontrolled release of an immense volume of water downstream into the Dnepr River, flooding communities below.

Over time, however, the tidelands may dry up, which the Ukrainian military could use to launch an offensive toward the Zaporozhye nuclear power plant, Mark Sleboda believes.

“There is the possibility they may attempt to cross the Kakhovka reservoir, which is now drained of water after they blew up the dam there. And it is currently drying. How fast it is drying? How fast it is turning from mudflats into terrain that could be crossed? But if it does, then they won’t need any amphibious assault to attack the approach at the nuclear power plant. They can just cross what used to be the Kakhovka reservoir on foot or possibly on some vehicles”, he said.

Although the expert said that heavy Western battle tanks, 60-ton Bradleys and the like don’t have a really good chance of crossing it yet.

“I think it will take months to really dry up for that. But we’ll see.”

Streets are flooded in Kherson, Tuesday, Jun 6, 2023 after the Kakhovka dam was blown up overnight.  - Sputnik International, 1920, 10.06.2023

Dnepr River to Return to Normal Level Below Kakhovka Dam by June 16 – Regional Official
At the same time, the claims of the Western media that it was the Russians who blew up the Kakhovka dam are inconsistent with the information and tactics used by Kiev at the very beginning of the Russian special military operation.

This was not the first time that Kiev has destroyed its own infrastructure in order to gain military momentum. During the defense of the capital, the Ukrainians resorted to destroying bridges and dams, with plans for further destruction if necessary.

“You don’t have to take my word for this. You can refer to The New York Times”, Sleboda said.

“Since the war’s early days, Ukraine has been swift and effective in wreaking havoc on its own territory, often by destroying infrastructure, as a way to foil a Russian army with superior numbers and weaponry,” he cited a New York Times article from April 2022.
Satellite image shows extensive flooding in Kherson region following Tuesday's Ukrainian attack on the Kakhovka hydroelectric power plant's dam. - Sputnik International, 1920, 08.06.2023

Kakhovka Dam Attack Lines Up With West’s ‘Scorched Earth’ Scenario for Ukraine

The initial plan of the Russians was to conduct rapid military operations, called “thunder runs,” into Ukrainian territory. The plan was to make a rapid show of force without engaging in major populated areas. The goal was to persuade the Ukrainians to retreat and surrender by capitalizing on their dissatisfaction with their current government.

According to Sleboda, this strategy worked well in the southern regions, where the Ukrainians surrendered without much resistance. However, this approach did not work in the areas around Kiev, he said, dismissing the notion that Russian forces were trying to take the city. He stressed that such an attempt would require a much larger force.

“The Kiev regime and the Western media tried to make it as if these 25,000 or so Russian troops around Kiev and the center of the country were there to try to take Kiev, which was ridiculous. You are going to need somewhere between 300,000 and 500,000 troops to lay siege to Kiev. The Russian military did not have the number of troops in Ukraine called up to do that. But like I said, Kiev wasn’t seriously being attacked anyway. That wasn’t the intention.”





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